The Velouté Sauce Makes Five

I can’t believe we did it! We have reached the fifth and final Mother Sauce of French Cuisine. While I’m no expert or even a trained chef, I understand the importance of sauces in cooking. Frankly, I think some of the things we eat are nothing more that a vehicle to transport a luscious sauce to our lips. I love escargot, but I’d have to admit it’s a fancy way to get garlic dripping in butter from the plate to my anxiously awaiting mouth.

Remember when we talked about Espagnole Sauce? We talked about the basic beginnings of the sauce, and that the technique used was the same as the one used to create our Velouté Sauce? While the technique is the same, the ingredients differ. Espagnole Sauce relies on stock made from roasted bones, preferably those of beef for that rich, dark color. The Roux is allowed to deepen into that beautiful caramel-coffee color. Velouté Sauce is also made from bone stock, but the bones have not been roasted, and traditionally the bones are those of chickens, veal or fish, keeping the stock lighter in color. The Roux is equally “blond”. Personally, I prefer the stock of chicken. Like Béchamel, Velouté is considered a white sauce. The difference between the two is that Béchamel Sauce utilizes a milk base, while Velouté is created from a stock. Since the bones used to create the stock vary, there are three different Velouté sauces, although the most common is made from the bones of a chicken that have not first been roasted. (We really shouldn’t spend too much time thinking about the origins of food, otherwise we might not ever eat again!)

Like all Mother Sauces, Velouté has her daughters. One of her chicken offspring is a Suprême Sauce. This sauce is considered to be a secondary Mother Sauce because it can be served as is or used as a basis for still more wonderful sauces.

Most of us make gravy, right? Check out a basic Chicken Velouté Sauce. I’d be willing to bet you it is your gravy recipe, or pretty darn close.

Chicken Velouté Sauce
2 Cups Chicken Stock
3 Tablespoons Butter
3 Tablespoon Flour
Salt to taste
White Pepper to taste

In a kettle with a spout, warm chicken stock. Keep warm over low heat.

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Once fully melted, sprinkle with flour and stir to blend. Stirring constantly cook the roux for 2 minutes, just long enough to remove the raw flour flavor without deepening the color.

Whisk stock into roux in ½ cup increments, whisking until well incorporated between each addition.

Bring mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and let summer for 15 minutes.

Remove from heat and serve.

This sauce is excellent ladled over mushrooms, rice or used as a gravy for chicken, potatoes or just about anything else.

Note: To make Veal Velouté Sauce or Fish Velouté Sauce, simply replace the chicken stock with either veal or fish stock.


Allemande Sauce
2 cups Veal Velouté Sauce
½ Cup Heavy Cream
1 Egg Yolk
Kosher Salt to Taste
White Pepper to Taste
A splash of Lemon Juice

Heat Velouté Sauce over medium-high heat in a heavy-bottom saucepan. Bring the sauce to a rolling boil, then lower to a simmer and reduce for about 6 minutes or until the total volume has reduced by half.

In a mixing bowl, beat together cream and egg yolk until smooth.

Slowly pour about ½ cup of the hot Velouté in two ¼ additions into the egg-cream mixture, whisking constantly to prevent the egg from curdling. This will temper the egg mixture.

Gradually whisk the warmed egg mixture back into the remaining Velouté. Bring the sauce back to a gentle simmer without letting it boil.

Remove from heat. Taste and season with a little salt and white pepper. Brighten with just a splash of lemon juice and serve.

This is wonderful over veal cutlets.


Normande Sauce
2 Cups Fish Velouté Sauce
¼ Cup Fish Stock
½ Cup Mushrooms
½ Cup Heavy Cream
2 Egg Yolks
1 ½ Tablespoons Butter

Chop mushrooms and set aside.

Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter into a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Sauté mushrooms until soft and their liquids released, about 4 minutes.

Add the Velouté and the fish stock to the mushrooms. Gradually bring mixture to a boil, then lower heat to a simmer. Let sauce simmer until reduce by about one-third.

In a mixing bowl, beat together the cream and egg yolks until smooth.

Slowly pour about ½ cup of the hot Velouté in two ¼ additions into the egg-cream mixture, whisking constantly to prevent the egg from curdling. This will temper the egg mixture.

Gradually whisk the warmed egg mixture back into the remaining Velouté. Bring the sauce back to a gentle simmer without letting it boil.

Remove from heat. Strain sauce, then swirl in the reaming butter while still hot and serve immediately.

This sauce is best served over fish or seafood. It is equally delicious with fettuccine containing seafood.


Suprême Sauce
2 cups Chicken Velouté Sauce
½ Cup Heavy Cream
1 ½ Teaspoons Butter
Kosher Salt to taste
White Pepper to taste
Splash of Lemon Juice

Heat Cream in a heavy-bottomed saucepan to just below a simmer. DO NOT allow cream to boil. Cover and keep warm.

In a separate pan, heat the Velouté Sauce over medium-high heat. Bring sauce to a boil, then lower heat to a simmer and reduce uncovered for about 5 minutes, or reduced by about half.

Stir the warm cream into the Velouté Sauce and bring back to a simmer for only a moment. Remove from heat, swirl in the butter.

Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Brighten with just a kiss of lemon juice.

Strain sauce through cheesecloth and serve immediately.

This sauce is great with delicate foods such as pastas, white meat chickens or summer squash.


Happy Saucing everyone!

Béchamel Sauce
Espagnole Sauce
Hollandaise Sauce
Tomate Sauce

Author: Rosemarie's Kitchen

I'm a wife, mother, grandmother and avid home cook.I believe in eating healthy whenever possible, while still managing to indulge in life's pleasures.

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