Asian Inspired Broiled Pork Tenderloin

Faults – we all have them. Inner conflicts, struggles and sometime out right declarations of war inside our heads. I am a creative person. I also tend to over think things, and that clashes with my creative, spontaneous side. When I take the time to make a list of pros and cons, the con column tends to outweigh the pro side. If I think about something for too long, chances are I’ll talk myself out of things. To avoid such situations, I tend to leap without looking. Hubby and I had our first date on a Monday and we were married that Saturday. Over thirty years later and I’ll have to admit that sometimes leaping without looking over the ledge is a good thing. Just to make sure, we had three weddings. The first was eloping in Lake Tahoe, the second was a renewal of vows in Glacier Bay with a few friends, and the final, over the top wedding was to renew our vows yet again on our 15th anniversary in the company of over 200 of our closest friends and family present. How could I resist? Hubby’s such a great man, with a twisted, nutty sense of humor. He always makes me laugh in spite of myself.

david

I have my own brand of crazy going on, although more quiet and hidden from most of the world. One of my crazy obsessions is with labels and categories. I have this need to have everything categorized, labeled and organized. This need to categorize includes all my recipes. Just because a recipe sounds good or tastes good doesn’t mean I can figure out how to “share” it properly, how to mark the proper boxes of categories and tags.  Marking this as a pork dish is obvious. But is it American? What is the subcategory? What side dishes can be served?  What are the predominant influences of the dish . . . and so on until I get all tangled up in analyzing and so on and oh my – my head is spinning! Soy sauce, ginger, brown sugar – I finally settled on Chinese-Asian. What a weight off my shoulders! That settled, the perfect side dish would be Spicy Asian Stir-Fry Spaghetti. Another delicious choice would be Sesame Soy Green Beans.

Finally I can share this wonderful pork with you. The port is so wonderful. Sweet and salty and oh so moist. Hope you enjoy this supper as much as we did.

Asian Inspired Broiled Pork Tenderloin
Marinade
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon brown sugar
3 tablespoons rice wine
2 cloves of garlic, pressed
1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Butterfly pork lengthwise. Place in a zip lock bag.

In a small bowl, mix all of the ingredients. When combined, pour the marinade over the tenderloin. Refrigerate for a 8 hours or overnight (best).

Pork
3 lbs pork tenderloin

Turn on your broiler to its HIGH setting. Remove the tenderloin from the marinade, letting any excess drip off. Place the tenderloins on a baking sheet covered in foil (think ahead – easy clean up), cut side up. Drizzle a little marinade over pork.

Broil the meat for 7-8 minutes. Turn tenderloin cut-side down. Drizzle marinade over pork. Continue to broil meat about 8-10 minutes or until 160 degrees.

Remove from oven, cover to keep warm and let rest about 5 minutes.

Slice pork against the grain. Transfer to a serving platter. Pour pan drippings over pork and enjoy.

Author: Rosemarie's Kitchen

I'm a wife, mother, grandmother and avid home cook.I believe in eating healthy whenever possible, while still managing to indulge in life's pleasures.

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