Convenience from the Freezer

National Frozen Food Day was created to celebrate the marvel that is the frozen food industry. We take these foods for granted as the convenience of modern life. That is right up until the power goes out, and then all we can think about are all those foods slowly thawing in the freezer.

We can thank an American inventor, entrepreneur and naturalist; Clarence Frank Birdseye, for the way foods are frozen today. While food preservation by freezing wasn’t new, Mr. Birdseye developed a freezing method that flash-froze foods thereby forming small ice crystals. He discovered that small ice crystals are key in preventing the cell walls from bursting and turning frozen foods to mush. Clarence Birdseye was a visionary. His earliest patents for flash freezing foods was in 1927. While refrigerators existed, less than 8 percent of American households had one in their homes. Freezers to store foods were unheard of and yet he saw a future in frozen foods. Clarence Birdseye died in 1956, but his name and the products he inspired continue today.

Two years before his death, Swanson Foods introduced the first complete frozen dinner to the public utilizing the flash-freeze method. Frozen dinners became all the rage, designed to eat in front of the TV. From the beginning, television became a focal point in the home. TV trays, stored conveniently away when not in use, began to replace the dining table and Mom was tossing out her apron now that she had TV Dinners.

At least that’s what they tell us. In our house, the TV was in the living room, we didn’t own TV trays, and dinner was served family-style in our cozy country kitchen.

Just for the record Frozen Food Day has been a round for a long while now. President Ronald Reagan signed Proclamation 5157 which reads “Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Regan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim March 6, 1984, as Frozen Food Day, and I call upon the American people to observe such a day with appropriate ceremonies and activities”.

President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan dine on TV trays in the White House residence.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve never attended a Frozen Food Ceremony. And I haven’t a clue as to what would constitute an appropriate activity. Hum. Well, this breakfast dose use frozen tater tots – does that count?

Tater Tot Waffles with Chorizo Scrambled Eggs
Non-Stick Cooking Spray as needed
36 Tater Tots, divided
1/2 lb Bulk Chorizo
8 Large Eggs
Pepper to taste
1/2 cup Mexican Cheese Blend, shredded
8 Nacho Jalapeno Peppers

Heat oven to 300 degrees. Place a baking rack inside a rimmed baking pan, place in the oven to heat. Spray waffle iron with non-stick spray. Heat on highest setting.

Working in batches, place 9 tater tots in each waffle well to create 2 potato waffles. Close lid, cook 10 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through. Transfer Tater Tot Waffle to rack in the oven to keep warm. Repeat three more times for a total of 8 squares have been made.

Meanwhile, in a large heavy bottom skillet cook chorizo, breaking apart as it cooks. Drain excess oils from the skillet.

Scramble eggs into the cooked chorizo. Season with pepper.

To serve, plate 2 Tater Tot Waffles on each individual plate. Top waffles with scrambled egg mixture. Sprinkle with Mexican Cheese, garnish with Jalapeno Peppers. Serve and enjoy!


Today is also National White Chocolate Cheesecake Day and Oreo Cookie Day – yum! Be sure to check out this delicious recipe from Just So Tasty for a beautiful White Chocolate Cheesecake with an Oreo Cookie Crust.

Now you’ve got breakfast and dessert. How you fill the rest of this beautiful March Day is up to you!

Author: Rosemarie's Kitchen

I'm a wife, mother, grandmother and avid home cook.I believe in eating healthy whenever possible, while still managing to indulge in life's pleasures.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s