You Can Do Anything with Chicken Wings

Many, many years ago, my Dad was partnered in a Butcher Shop. My brother learned the value of hard physical work as a boy sweeping floors and helping with deliveries. I learned about bookkeeping while working on the office side of the business.

Way back then, chicken wings were considered disposable. Even whole chickens had their wings clipped off and tossed into a bag. The wings were used for making soups or broths, and sold for ten-cents a bag. Now the wing is the most expensive part of the bird. I can get chicken thighs for 99 cents a pound, but chicken wings can run as much as 5 dollars a pound. Since a pound of chicken wings gives you about 4 or 5 actual wings, those wings are a dollar a pop. Wow, that’s just nuts.

As the Super Bowl draws near, the price of wings goes up. And the media loves to report that there may be a shortage of wings this year, making everyone run to the market to get their wings at inflated prices before they are all gone.

Still, you gotta love wings. What’s a Super Bowl without wings? And wings are amazing. Any recipe you have for chicken can be adapted to wings. So glad there’s more to wings than Buffalo.

Buffalo Wings

A few years back, we had an appetizer party for my Dad’s birthday. All finger-foods prepared by my sisters and I for Dad and his retired buddies. I knew Dad loved Chicken Adobo, so why not make Adobo with Chicken Wings? Let me tell you, they were delicious, and at the end of the party not a wing remained.

Adobo Style Wings
3 lbs Chicken Wings (approximately 15 wings)
1 1/2 cups Soy sauce
1/2 cup Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 cup Rice Vinegar
1 cup Chicken Stock
Water as needed
8 Garlic Cloves
2 Bay Leaves
1 tablespoon Black Pepper Corns
2 tablespoons Cornstarch

Place the wings in a large stock pot. Add soy sauce, Worcestershire Sauce, Rice Vinegar and chicken stock to the pot. Add just enough water to submerge the wings completely.

Peel garlic cloves, scatter over the chicken. Add Bay Leaves and Pepper Corns. Over medium heat, bring the adobo to a low boil.

Cover, and cook for 30 to 45 minutes over low heat. Remove cover, continue to cook about 15 minutes longer.

Remove wings with a large slotted spoon or spider strainer.

Place some sauce in a small bowl. Add cornstarch to the bowl to create a slurry. Add slurry back into pot, cook until the sauce becomes thick. The sauce can then be poured over the wings or served as an adobo dipping sauce.

Note: If you prefer the skins to be a bit more crisp, spread wings out on a rimmed baking sheet and place under the broiler for about 5 minutes. Keep an eye on things as the wings will sizzle and pop.

Author: Rosemarie's Kitchen

I'm a wife, mother, grandmother and avid home cook.I believe in eating healthy whenever possible, while still managing to indulge in life's pleasures.

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